How Apprenticeships Work


Our Definition:   More hands-on than a "mentorship", more equitable than an "internship"; apprenticeships are a collaborative way to trade knowledge and skills for help with making.


Finding an Apprentice

  • Post

  • Choose a type: production, event, ongoing, or 1-day apprenticeship.
  • Edit the details.
  • Only pay the $30.00 listing fee when you accept each apprentice.
  • Confirm

  • Review tips for having a great apprenticeship.
  • We'll remind you when you're about to start.
  • We'll charge you the matching fee when your apprentice has confirmed.
  • Support

  • The GirlsGuild team is here to help you along the way.
  • We'll send occasional feedback prompts.
  • We help track the skills and tools you're teaching.

Becoming an Apprentice

  • Confirm

  • Optionally meet up to see if it's a good fit.
  • Pay a $30.00 matching fee to confirm.
  • Do a little dance!
  • Track

  • We'll help track the skills and tools you're learning.
  • We'll send occasional feedback emails.
  • We're here to help with anything along the way!
  • Progress
    Coming Soon!

  • We'll build out a portfolio that shows off your skills.
  • Makers will search portfolios and find you!
  • Use it to apply for schools or a job.

What to expect /   Here's how to structure an equitable exchange...

As a Maker

  • Hours: Schedule 4-16 hours/week to get your apprentice up to speed quickly. It's best if you decide on a consistent schedule at the start, and stick to it.

  • Timeframe: We suggest you divide the timeframe up into 2 equal parts. You'll spend the first part teaching and practicing, and the last part instructing when needed while working together.

  • Instruction: We ask that you work in the same location for at least 50% of the time you've scheduled for the apprenticeship in order to allow for questions and feedback to happen naturally.

  • Skills: You should be teaching the skills and tools that are required for the kind of work that you need help with.

  • Feedback: Give feedback on how the apprentice is doing as she learns, allowing her to ask questions, make mistakes and practice. We're happy to help facilitate a mid-way check in to chat about goals and progress.

As an Apprentice

  • Hours: Be honest about your availability. Once you decide on a set schedule, make sure it's on your calendar. You should always give your maker-mentor at least 24 hours notice for cancellations.

  • Timeframe: We suggest the timeframe be divided into 2 equal parts. You'll spend the first part learning and practicing, and the last part asking for feedback when needed and working together.

  • Instruction: We ask that you work in the same location for at least 50% of the time you've scheduled for the apprenticeship in order to allow for questions and feedback to happen naturally.

  • Skills: You should be learning the skills and tools that are required for the kind of work that you're helping with.

  • Feedback: Practice asking for feedback on how you're doing as you learn. It's ok to ask lots of questions, make mistakes and practice! We're happy to help facilitate a mid-way check in to chat about goals and progress, or if any issues arise.

"Veronica brought up the fact that the apprenticeship was originally set to end in December, and at the same time she and I looked at each other and said "yeah, right. I'm not letting you go!"

"I taught class to a group of young woman who learned new skills that they may not have had access to before. These skills are not only fun and cool but also empowering."

"I put my apprenticeship with GirlsGuild on my resume, and it was actually a conversation piece in my job interviews."


"Thanks for the opportunity to join Son of a Sailor! I started the apprenticeship today and already made 10 necklaces, how great, right? Jessica is a dream to work with!"


Why it Works /   GirlsGuild was built for real people, to solve real problems.


We think the most important part of our service is the support and facilitation we provide around structuring an equitable trade of teaching for work, and the reason it’s important comes from research.

The concept for GirlsGuild originally came from research into eating disorders among young women, and the process of recovery. We interviewed women in recovery and professionals in the field, and learned two major insights:

  • A key part of recovery is finding creative outlets and building skills around them
  • It’s important in recovery to rebuild supportive social connections and community

We took those ideas of building skills in creative fields, and forming supportive social connections, and brought them together under the apprenticeship model of working and learning in hands-on, one-to-one mentorship relationships.

In the two years we’ve been building on that concept, we’ve kept those insights as the foundation of the GirlsGuild service, for the benefit of all girls and women.



Still not sure if you're ready?

We've put together a checklist to help you decide if you're ready to host an apprenticeship.

Or maybe you know someone who would be a wonderful Maker-mentor?
Nominate a Maker and we'll ask them how we can help!



Nominate a Maker